Turkish Neurosurgery 2016 , Vol 26 , Num 4
The Management of Intracranial Aneurysms During Pregnancy: A Systematic Review
Eric BARBARITE, Shahrose HUSSAIN, Anna DELLAROLE, Mohamed Samy ELHAMMADY, Eric PETERSON
University of Miami, Department of Neurological Surgery, Miami, FL, USA DOI : 10.5137/1019-5149.JTN.15773-15.0 Hemodynamic changes during pregnancy may favor the formation and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. Despite this risk, guidelines for managing intracranial aneurysms during pregnancy have not been clearly defined. The objective of this review is to describe the treatment options for pregnant women with intracranial aneurysms, and to report the maternal and fetal outcomes associated with different treatment strategies. A search of the literature was conducted using the PubMed database for the period January 1991 through June 2015. Aneurysm characteristics and management, pregnancy management, and maternal and fetal outcomes were evaluated. The most recent search was performed in June 2015. In total, 50 aneurysms (44 patients) were evaluated. Rupture was confirmed upon imaging in 36 aneurysms (72%), and most aneurysms ruptured during the third trimester (77.8%). Coil embolization was associated with a lower complication rate than clipping in patients with ruptured aneurysms (9.5% vs 23.1%). For patients with unruptured aneurysms, surgical management was associated with 31.9% fewer complications compared to no treatment. Most patients underwent Cesarean delivery (84%), and a combined neurosurgical-obstetrical procedure was used for 8 patients with ruptured aneurysms near term. Adverse outcomes were reported in 11.9% of children. Treatment of intracranial aneurysms during pregnancy is safe and effective. Furthermore, we suggest that coil embolization be considered a first line treatment over clipping for surgical management of the pregnant population. Going forward, we encourage the establishment of formal guidelines for managing intracranial aneurysms during pregnancy. Keywords : Intracranial aneurysm, Subarachnoid hemorrhage, Pregnancy
Corresponding author : Eric Barbarte, e.barbarite@med.miami.edu